Logo
. Accountability Report Cards Attendance Boundaries Directions and Contacts Websites
Early Literacy Initiative Special Education External Study and Task Force Strategic Action Planning/Local Accountability Plan
Common Core Standards Department of Education Data Mandated Reporter Information New to Brentwood Schools Q - ParentConnection Parent Leader Information from Business Services Strategic Action Planning/Local Accountability Plan Title IX Information
District Office Contacts Business Services Curriculum & Instruction Food Services Human Resources Maintenance and Operations Office of the Superintendent Special Education Student Services Technology
Bell Schedules Board of Education Cafeteria Menus District Calendars District Core Beliefs Education Foundation Facility Use Requests Office of the Superintendent School Board Transportation Measure B Modernization Program BUSD Budget Focus Group
. Ed1Stop Employee Email Inside Brentwood Munis Employee Self Service Q-Web Request Tech or Maint Support Tech and Q Documentation FrontLine Education (formerly Aesop)

Contact Us

Jeff Weiss, Director

jweiss@brentwood.k12.ca.us

Phone:  925-513-6319

Fax:  925-513-8634

 

Lynelle Russell, Secretary

lrussell@brentwood.k12.ca.us

Phone: 925-513-6317

Fax: 925-513-8634

 

Anna Foster, Secretary

afoster@brentwood.k12.ca.us

Phone: 925-513-6318

Fax: 925-513-8634

 

Mark Baldwin, Program Specialist  (Adams, Edna Hill, Ron Nunn, Brentwood Elementary, Krey)

mbaldwin@brentwood.k12.ca.us

Phone:  925-513-6300 ext 2273

Fax: 925-513-8634

 

Robyn Byrd, Program Specialist (Preschool)

rbyrd@brentwood.k12.ca.us

Phone: 925-513-6309

Fax: 925-513-8634

 

Brooke Gettig, Program Specialist (Bristow, Mary Casey Black, Marsh Creek, Pioneer, Loma Vista)

bgettig@brentwood.k12.ca.us

Phone: 925-513-6300 ext 2250

Fax: 925-513-8634

 

Shannon Hendricks, Fiscal Analyst

shendricks@brentwood.k12.ca.us

Phone: 925-513-6309

Fax: 925-513-8634

Guide to the IEP Process

What should I do if my child is struggling?

We are here to help!  When children struggle in school, we work with families and guardians to put them into the Student Study Team process. Start by looking at this page on our website.

What is an IEP?

The IEP, Individualized Education Program, is a written document developed for each public school child who is eligible for special education.  The IEP is created through a team effort and reviewed at least once per year. Before an IEP can be written, your child must be determined eligible for special education.  By Federal law, a multidisciplinary team must determine that your child 1) has a disability and 2) requires special education services to benefit from the general education program.

IEP Team Members

The members of the multidisciplinary team who develop your child's IEP include:

  • You, the parents/guardians
  • General education Teacher
  • A special education teacher who has training and experience in educating children with disabilities
  • An individual who can interpret the instructional implications of the assessment results
  • A representative of the school district who know about special education services and has the authority to commit resources
  • Individuals who have knowledge or special expertise about your child who are invited by you and/or the school district
  • Representatives from transition services agencies, when such services are being discussed
  • Your child, when appropriate, and whenever transition is discussed

Your role at the IEP Meeting

As equal members of the IEP team, parents of a student being assessed shall be encouraged to participate in developing, reviewing and revising the student’s Individualized Education Program.

Here are some ideas that may help you reduce your anxiety, increase your participation and facilitate the process:

  • Communicate regularly with school staff so you both have a mutual understanding of your child's needs
  • Prepare your thoughts before the meeting by writing down the important points you want to make about your child.
  • Take someone with you to serve as your support system.  If you decide to bring a friend or advocate, inform the school so they are aware of whom you're bringing
  • Ask questions if you don't understand the terms being used.  If necessary, arrange to meet with individuals after the meeting to review their reports
  • Try to stay focused and positive
  • Remember you can sign in attendance, but you don't have to agree to the goals or services at the meeting.  You can take the IEP documents home to review, get input, and return later.

Parents must give consent before any special education service may be provided.

Interpreters for the deaf or for parents whose primary language is not English will be provided when necessary.

A meeting may be held by teleconference upon mutual agreement of all parties.

What Happens Next

Written parent permission is required before the IEP can be implemented.  If you agree with only parts of the IEP, let the team know so services can begin for your child in those areas.
 
The IEP is reviewed at least once a year.  However, if you or the teacher believe that your child isn't making progress or has achieved the goals sooner than expected, a meeting may be scheduled to revise the IEP.  If you believe an IEP meeting is needed, put your request in writing and send it to your student's Case Manager or Teacher. We have 30 days to schedule the meeting.

Work collaboratively with the staff responsible for your child's IEP and ask what you can do to reinforce skills at home.

Contents of the IEP

The IEP guarantees the necessary supports and services that are agreed upon for your child.  At least, the IEP must contain the following information:

  • Present Levels of Educational Performance
  • Goals
  • Special Education and Related Services
  • Other:
    • The extent, if any, to which your child will not participate with non-disabled peers in the regular class and other school activities
    • Whether your child will take state and district-wide tests, with or without accommodations, or have an alternative assessment
    • When services begin, where and how often they'll be provided
    • Necessary transition services (age 16)
  • Special Factors depending on your child's needs:
    • Behavior management supports and strategies
    • Language needs as related to the IEP if an English Learner
    • Communication needs
    • Assistive technology devices or services required in order to receive FAPE
    • Necessary accommodations in the general education classroom